Desktop Calendar Tutorial
by Whisper

This tutorial was created and put on this site on October 16, 2002.
It is property of and 2001-2002 to Whisper's Web Works.
Please do not copy or place this tutorial or any of the graphics on any site,
email or elist without written permission directly from me. If you would like to share the url for this tutorial, you may do so without writing for permission, but I always welcome a "who, where" email.  Thank you.

For this tutorial you will need:
PSP 7 ~ download a trial version.
Fall leaves tile ~ download here.

This tutorial is written with Win98 and Win2000 in mind, but you should be able to use it with other operating systems.

First we need to know what size to make our calendar.

In a blank area of your desktop right click and choose Properties.

Click on the Settings tab at the top.

You should have a Display Properties box similar to this:


(Click for a larger view.)

In the right box you see your Screen area.  This is the size that you should make for your desktop calendar.

Now you want to open a new graphic in PSP in the size that is showing in your Screen area.  The size I will be making is 1024 x 768.

Open a new image:
1024 x 768 pixels
Transparent
16.7 Million colors

Other standard screen sizes are 800 x 600 and 1280 x 1024.  Minimize this image.

Click cancel on the Display Properties box and go back to PSP.

Open another new graphic 100 less on width and height than the first one.  So I would open a new graphic 924 x 668.  (You may want to adjust the size depending on the size of border that you want.)

We will build our calendar template now.  Be sure to save on a regular basis.

For November we need 7 rows horizontally.  (Get out your calculator.)  You can adjust the spacing to your liking and to fit the size of your desktop area.  This is the breakdown of my spacing:
First row (month name) - 100
Second row (days) - 50
Third through seventh rows (numbers) - 103

So with your draw tool set at Single line, width 2 or 3, Antialias checked and Vector UNchecked; draw a straight line all the way across your image starting at 0,100.  (When wanting to draw a straight line hold down your shift key.)

Add a new layer.

For your second row draw a straight line all the way across your image starting at 0,150.

This is what we have so far:

(Click for a larger view.)

Now for your calculator.  Take your height number (668) minus your first two rows (150) and this will give you the number for the left over space (518).  Divide this number (518) by the number of rows that you still need (5) and you will get the spacing amount (103.6).

Add a new layer.

After doing our math we know that we need to add 150 (where our last line was placed) to 103 and that will be where our next line goes, 253.  Draw a line all the way across.

Add a new layer.

Add 253 and 103 again to get your next line placement - 356.  Draw a line all the way across.

Add a new layer.

Add 356 and 103 again to get your next line placement - 459.  Draw a line all the way across.

Add a new layer.

Once more add 459 and 103 to get your last horizontal line placement - 562.  Draw a line all the way across.

This is how it should look now:
(I filled my background with white so it was easier to see.)

(Click for a larger view.)

Now we will place our vertical lines.

This won't be too bad for us math challenged folk!  Just take your over all width (924) and divide by 7.  I get 132.  So you need to place a line every 132 pix, but you do not want to go into the top box.  So you would start with your cursor at 132,100 and draw straight down.

Continue to add 132 for each new line that you draw.  Be sure to add a new layer for each line.  If you are using my spacing numbers then your cursor would start at these numbers for each line:
264,100
396,100
528,100
660,100
792,100

Now we have our 7 rows horizontally and 7 rows vertically.

If you like the spacing of your lines turn off any background layer you might have and in your Layer Palette, right click on one of your line layers and choose Merge > Merge visible.

If you would like a line border around your calendar add a new layer.

Selections > Select all.

Selections > Modify > Contract > 2 or 3 (same width as your lines) > ok.

Selections > Invert.

Flood fill your selection with the same color as your lines.

Selections > Select none.

Turn off your background layer and right click on one of your line layers and choose Merge > Merge visible.

You should now have your basic calendar template.


(Click for a larger view.)

You should save this as a PSP file somewhere safe for future use.

 

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